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Regime Evolution, Institutional Change, and Social Transformation in Russia: Lessons for Political Science

April 27 - 28, 2018

Conference Collage

On April 27-28, 2018, Yale University hosted an international conference dedicated to the current state of scholarship at the intersection of Russian Studies and Political Science. Over 30 leading scholars from North American, Russian, and European universities participated, offering their views of the field and the importance of Russian studies for political science as a whole. The two-day conference was preceded by a one-day graduate student workshop, in which a dozen up-and-coming scholars from around the world discussed and received feedback on their dissertation work. In order to preserve a record of these extraordinary discussions, we have asked participants to allow us to share abstracts, short summaries, or other versions of the papers they presented in the version of the program reproduced below. Many of the conference contributions will also be published in one form or another; we will link to those publications as they appear. Although this work represents only a portion of the cutting-edge research being done today at the intersections of Russian Studies and Political Science–our conference could easily have been twice the size–we see it as evidence of a vibrant and growing field. We are grateful to the Carnegie Corporation, the Edward J and Dorothy Kempf Memorial Fund at the MacMillan Center, the European Studies Council, the Yale Department of Political Science, and the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs for making this gathering possible.

–Stephen E. Hanson and Douglas Rogers, Co-organizers


Graduate Student WorkshopGraduate Student Workshop
Sterling Memorial Library Memorabilia Room
Yale University
Thursday, April 26, 2018

Historical Legacies and Regime Evolution
Chair: Juliet Johnson, McGill University

“Inflaming the Public Opinion in Late Soviet Russia: the Gdlyan-Ivanov Affair, 1987-1991
Riccardo Cucciolla (Luis Guido Carli, Rome/Higher School of Economics, Moscow)

“A Never-ending Crisis. Moscow’s Nationalities Policies. From the Soviet Union to Russia 1989-1993”
Carolina DeStefano (Ph.D. Candidate, Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies in Pisa, and Visiting researcher, Higher School of Economics, Moscow)

Comparative Study of the Russian and French Innovation Policy Trajectories: The Changing Role of the State
Elena Yamburenko (MGIMO University, Moscow)

Ethnicity, Regionalism, and Migration
Chair: Yoshiko Hererra, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Graduate student workshop
 

“Politics of Immigration Under Authoritarianism”
Song Ha Joo (Princeton University)

Laws in Conflict: Legacies of War and Legal Pluralism in Chechnya
Egor Lazarev (Columbia University)

Political Transformation under Control: Factors of Electoral Loyalty in Russia’s Ethnic Regions
Tatyana Tkacheva (European University of Saint Petersburg)

Public Opinion and Social Mobilization
Chair: Vladimir Gel’man, European University of St. Petersburg

Shoring Up Autocracy: Participatory Technologies and Regime Support in Putin’s Russia
Hannah Chapman (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Where Did Everyone Go? Social Movement Demobilization in Ukraine and Russia
Virginie Lasnier (McGill University, Montréal)

When Reporting Bad News is a Good Strategy: Autocratic Propaganda and Market Pressures
Anton Shirikov (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

“(Mis)information in Autocracies: A Computational Approach with Application to Russia”
Denis Stukal (New York University)

The Sources of Russian Foreign Policy
Chair: Stephen E. Hanson, William and Mary

Advantages of Autocratic Sponsorship: The Durability of Superpower Client Regimes
Adam Casey (University of Toronto)

Manufacturing Dissent: Evaluating the Effect of State-Sponsored Propaganda
Aleksandr Fisher (The George Washington University, Washington D.C.)

Uses of Greatness in Russian International Politics: A Conceptual History of Velikaya Derzhava
Anatoly Reshetnikov (Central European University, Budapest)

Regime Evolution, Institutional Change, and Social Transformation in Russia:
Lessons for Political Science
Yale University
April 27-28, 2018

Welcome and Introductory Remarks by:
Douglas Rogers, Department of Anthropology and Russian Studies Initiative, Yale University
Steven Wilkinson, Chair, Department of Political Science, Yale University
Stephen E. Hanson, Vice Provost for International Affairs, William & Mary

Doug Rogers, Steven Wilkinson
Doug Rogers, Steven Wilkinson

Panel I: Assessing the State of Russian Studies in Political Science Debates
Chair: Kate Baldwin, Yale University

Brian Taylor, Andrei Melville, Jeffrey Kopstein
Brian Taylor, Andrei Melville, Jeffrey Kopstein

What Russia Teaches Us about Comparative Politics, and Vice Versa
Jordan Gans-Morse, Northwestern University

Is Russia Really a Normal Country? A Numerical Taxonomy of Russia and the Postcommunist World
Jeffrey Kopstein, University of California, Irvine

Can Post-Soviet Studies Contribute to Current Political Science Debates?
Andrei Melville, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

“What Happened to Russian Security Studies?”
Brian Taylor, Syracuse University

Panel II: Lessons of Soviet History
Chair: Sergei Antonov, Yale University

Marlene Laruelle, Oleg Kharkhordin
Marlene Laruelle, Oleg Kharkhordin

“The Weight of the Soviet Past after 1991”
Andrea Graziosi, University of Naples

Harassing Deficiencies in Data: What the Soviet and Russian Experience Can Teach Us about Extracting Information from Authoritarian Regimes
Yoshiko Herrera, University of Wisconsin

Institutions and Authoritarianism: The Role of the Communist Party in Soviet Durability
Lucan Way, University of Toronto

Mass Repression and Political Loyalty: A Dual Legacy of Stalin’s Famine in Ukraine
Yuri Zhukov, University of Michigan

Lucan Way, Juliet Johnson, Kathryn Stoner, Jeffrey Kopstein, Valerie Bunce
Lucan Way, Juliet Johnson, Kathryn Stoner, Jeffrey Kopstein, Valerie Bunce

Panel III: Political Protest and Accommodation
Chair: Jason Lyall, Yale University

The Good Russian: Constructing the Authoritarian Citizen
Samuel Greene, King’s College London

From Nation Building to Managing Ethnicity
Peter Rutland, Wesleyan University

Explaining Russian Protest: Individual Mobilization in Contemporary Autocracy
Regina Smyth, Indiana University

Keynote Panel: U.S.-Russian Relations in a Turbulent Era
Celeste Wallander, President, U.S.-Russia Foundation
Moderator: Stephen E. Hanson, Vice Provost for International Affairs, William & Mary

Celeste Wallander, Stephen E. Hanson
Celeste Wallander, Stephen E. Hanson

Panel IV: The Role of Political Culture
Chair: Ian Johnson, Yale University

Juliet Johnson, Oleg Kharkhordin, Ian Johnson
Juliet Johnson, Oleg Kharkhordin, Ian Johnson

The ‘Monumental Politics’ of Post-Soviet Russia: How the Soviet Collapse Revitalized the Study of Symbolic Politics in Political Science
Juliet Johnson, McGill University

“Republicanism in Russia: Recovering or Reinventing a Tradition?”
Oleg Kharkhordin, European University of Saint Petersburg

Cultural Studies and Their Role in Understanding Russia’s Political Regime
Marlene Laruelle, George Washington University
View Yale Global article

Panel V: Political Discourse, Identity, and Legitimacy
Chair: Dan Mattingly, Yale University

Valerie Sperling, Viacheslav Morozov, Olga Malinova, Dan Mattingly
Valerie Sperling, Viacheslav Morozov, Olga Malinova,
Dan Mattingly

The ‘Hard’ 1990s vs. the ‘Stable’ 2000s: Making Sense of the Post-Soviet Transition in Russian Political Discourse
Olga Malinova, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

“Institutions, Discourses, and Uneven Development: the Material and the Ideational in Russia’s ‘Incomplete’ Europeanization”
Viacheslav Morozov, University of Tartu
View Yale Global article

Masculinity, Misogyny, and Political Image Crafting in Russia and the U.S.
Valerie Sperling, Clark University

Panel VI: The Politics of Institutional Reform in the Post-Soviet Context
Chair: Milan Svolik, Yale University

Maria Popova, Nikolai Petrov
Maria Popova, Nikolai Petrov
Maria Popova, Nikolai Petrov, Vladimir Gelman, Noah Buckley
Maria Popova, Nikolai Petrov, Vladimir Gelman,
Noah Buckley

Coalitions and Cohorts: Network Analysis of Elites in Autocratic Regimes
Noah Buckley, NYU Abu Dhabi

Politics vs. Policy: Technocratic Traps of the Post-Soviet Reforms
Vladimir Gel’man, European University of Saint Petersburg

Substitutionalization of Politics
Nikolai Petrov, Higher School of Economics, Moscow

“The Weaponization of Law and Regime Dynamics”
Maria Popova, McGill University

Panel VII: Public Opinion in Russia and the West
Chair: Alexander Coppock, Yale University

Timothy Frye, Steve Fish
Timothy Frye, Steve Fish

Tit-for-Tat: US Democracy Promotion versus Russian Populism Promotion
Valerie Bunce, Cornell University

Putin and the West through Russian Eyes
Henry Hale, George Washington University

Putin and Populism
Steve Fish, UC Berkeley

Autocratic Politics and Public Opinion
Tim Frye, Columbia University

Panel VIII: Russia, the West, and the Future of Global Order
Chair: Thomas Graham, Yale University

Kathryn Stoner, Volodymyr Dubovyk, Thomas Graham
Kathryn Stoner, Volodymyr Dubovyk, Thomas Graham
Joshua Tucker, Mikhail Troitskiy, Stanislav Tkachenko, Kathryn Stoner, Volodymyr Dubovyk, Thomas Graham
Joshua Tucker, Mikhail Troitskiy, Stanislav Tkachenko,
Kathryn Stoner, Volodymyr Dubovyk, Thomas Graham

Ukraine and Russia: The Peace, the War, the Future?
Volodymyr Dubovyk, Odessa Mechnikov National University

What Russia Teaches Us Now: Re-Conceptualizing ‘Power” in International Relations
Kathryn Stoner, Stanford University

“The Political Economy of Russian Coercive Diplomacy”
Stanislav Tkachenko, Saint Petersburg State University

Leveraging Ambiguity in Russian Foreign Policy: Implications for Theories of Status and Negotiation
Mikhail Troitskiy, MGIMO University

Bot of Course Russia is Important for Political Science!
Joshua Tucker, NYU